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The Juno Mission

JUNO MISSION LOG

Infographic: Juno, Built to Withstand Intense Radiation Environments

Juno has been headed for Jupiter since 2011 to study the gas giant’s atmosphere, aurora, gravity and magnetic field.
This infographic illustrates the radiation environments Juno has traveled through on its journey near Earth and in interplanetary space.
All of space is filled with particles, and when these particles get moving at high speeds, they’re called radiation.
NASA studies space radiation to better protect spacecraft as they travel through space, as well as to understand how this space environment
influences planetary evolution. After Jupiter orbit insertion on July 4, 2016, Juno will have the chance to study one of the most intense radiation
environments in our solar system.


The Juno photographic mission

Citizen-scientists Matt Brealey and Gustavo B C processed this color-enhanced image of a Jupiter storm using data captured on Feb. 7, 2018, by the JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft. Credit: Matt Brealey/Gustavo B C/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

JunoCam took this image during its eleventh close flyby of Jupiter on February 7, 2018. Image credit: NASA / JPL / SwRI / MSSS / David Marriott.

Spectacular VLT images of Jupiter presented before Juno’s arrival
EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY PRESS RELEASE

In preparation for the imminent arrival of NASA’s Juno spacecraft in July 2016,
astronomers used ESO’s Very Large Telescope to obtain spectacular new infrared images
of Jupiter using the VISIR instrument. This false-colour image was created by selecting
and combining the best images obtained from many short VISIR exposures at a wavelength of 5 micrometres.
Image credit: ESO/L. Fletcher.


False colour images generated from VLT observations in February 2016 (left) and March 2016 (right),
showing two different faces of Jupiter. The bluer areas are cold and cloud-free, the orangey areas are warm and cloudy,
more colourless bright regions are warm and cloud-free, and dark regions are cold and cloudy (such as the Great Red Spot
and the prominent ovals). The wave pattern over the North Equatorial Band shows up in orange.
These views were created from VLT/VISIR infrared images. The orange images were obtained at 10.7 micrometres wavelength
and highlight the different temperatures and presence of ammonia.
The blue images at 8.6 micrometres highlight variations in cloud opacity.
Image credit: ESO/L. Fletcher.


This view compares a lucky imaging view of Jupiter from VISIR (left) at infrared wavelengths with a
very sharp amateur image in visible light from about the same time (right).
Image credit: ESO/L. Fletcher/Damian Peach.


Home/News/Juno gets the first-ever view of Jupiter's North Pole Juno gets the first-ever view of Jupiter's North Pole Some never-before-seen features come to light. By Carl Engelking | Published: Friday, September 02, 2016


Even from afar, we always knew Jupiter was a bit of an oddball, and upon closer examination we were correct. On Aug. 27, NASA’s Juno spacecraft, with all its instruments blazing, swooped within 2,500 miles of the Jovian surface
and beamed back the first-ever images of its north pole. It was the first of 36 planned flybys planned for the mission,
so there’s plenty more where this came from. Still, even from the first 6-megabyte download, Jupiter’s revealing
why it’s unlike any other planet in our solar system.


An infrared glimpse at Jupiter’s south pole.
(Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS) “First glimpse of Jupiter’s north pole, and it looks like nothing we have seen or imagined before,”
said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the
Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio in a press statement Friday September 02, 2016.


Juno probe peers below Jupiter's clouds


This image from Juno’s JunoCam captured the south pole in visible light only. It’s a puzzle why the north and south poles are so similar, yet have a different number of cyclones. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles Credit bbc.com"


GAZE IN WONDER AT JUPITER’S MYSTERIOUS GEOMETRIC POLAR STORMS


This wondrous image of Jupiter's south pole shows the arrangement of cyclones that is unique in our Solar System: five circumpolar cyclones perfectly arranged around a single polar cyclone. Image: NASA/SWRI/JPL/ASI/INAF/IAPS


This composite imageshows the central cyclone at the planet’s north pole and the eight cyclones that encircle it. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM. This is hardly the orange, white and saffron belted world we are familiar with from telescope views of the lower latitudes. The scale of these storms is, as you would expect with Jupiter, quite impressive. Alberto Adriani is a Juno co-investigator based at the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology in Rome:


This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region. NASA’s Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7, 2018 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter’s clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude. Citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. This image was created by reprocessing raw JunoCam data using trajectory and pointing data from the spacecraft. This image is one in a series of images taken in an experiment to capture the best results for illuminated parts of Jupiter's polar region. To make features more visible in Jupiter’s terminator — the region where day meets night — the Juno team adjusted JunoCam so that it would perform like a portrait photographer taking multiple photos at different exposures, hoping to capture one image with the intended light balance. For JunoCam to collect enough light to reveal features in Jupiter’s dark twilight zone, the much brighter illuminated day-side of Jupiter becomes overexposed with the higher exposure. JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at: More information about Juno is at: and here Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt


The awesome beauty of Jupiter captured by Juno, in 13 photos
For the past two years, the spacecraft has been taking photos of Jupiter. Here are the best shots.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 BY EVAN GOUGH
JunoCam Wows Us Again With Detailed Images of the Great Red Spot

For almost 200 years humans have been watching the Great Red Spot (GRS) on Jupiter and wondering what’s behind it. Thanks to NASA’s Juno mission, we’ve been getting better and better looks at it. New images from JunoCam reveal some of the deeper detail in our Solar System’s longest-lived storm.

Images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot have gotten better over the decades. On the left is an image from the Voyager mission, middle is an image from the Galileo mission, and on the right is a Hubble Space Telescope Image. Image: NASA/ESA/Evan Gough

JunoCam image of the Great Red Spot showing:
  • (A) compact cloud clusters;
  • (B) mesoscale waves;
  • (C) spiraling vortices;
  • (D) a central turbulent nucleus;
  • (E) examples of elongated thin dark gray filaments.
Image: NASA/A. Sanchez-Lavega et. al.

The study identifies five different morphological features in the Great Red Spot. From top to bottom:
  • compact cloud clusters
  • mesoscale waves
  • spiraling vortices
  • the central turbulent nucleus
  • and large dark thin filaments
  • Image: American Astronomical Society/Sanchez-Lavega et al.

Article: A Whole New Jupiter:
First Science Results from NASA’s Juno Mission



Infographic: Juno, Built to Withstand Intense Radiation Environments -
PHOTO MONTAGE OF THE LAUNCH

Technician’s install Juno’s titanium vault. (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LMSS)


The JUNO ProBe on it's way to Florida


Exploded diagram of the Juno Probe


Atlas Rocket Ready to launch


Juno Mission Clearing the Lightning Rod's Towers


Juno soars skyward to Jupiter on Aug. 5, 2011 from launch pad 41 at
Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 12:25 p.m. EDT. View from the VAB roof.
Credit: Ken Kremer/


Juno Mission on the way!!!


Juno Mission Launch Vehicle Diagram


NASA prepares its Jupiter probe JUNO for arrival blogger-avatarby Jon Fingas July 08, 2015

It's been a long time in coming, but NASA's Juno probe is finally close to reaching Jupiter.
NASA reports that the spacecraft is "on track" to arrive on July 4th, 2016 (how American!),
and that the ground crew is tweaking the flight plan to at once give Juno more time and complete tasks ahead of schedule.
The ship's initial orbit is splitting into two in order to test instruments before the science gathering starts.
Also, it'll take 14 days to complete an orbit rather than the originally planned 11.
[Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech]

NASA prepares its Jupiter probe JUNO for arrival blogger-avatarby Jon Fingas July 08, 2015

Since its launch five years ago, there have been three forces tugging at NASA's Juno spacecraft
as it speeds through the solar system. The sun, Earth and Jupiter have all been influential --
a gravitational trifecta of sorts. At times, Earth was close enough to be the frontrunner.
More recently, the sun has had the most clout when it comes to Juno's trajectory.
Today, it can be reported that Jupiter is now in the gravitational driver’s seat,
and the basketball court-sized spacecraft is not looking back.

Home/News/NASA returns to Jupiter 20 years after Galileo
NASA returns to Jupiter 20 years after Galileo
The Juno spacecraft meets the gas giant July 4, finally ending the decades-long hiatus of Jupiter missions.
By Eric Betz | Published: Monday, December 7, 2015

The Juno spacecraft will enter orbit around Jupiter on July 4, 2016,
picking up the exploration efforts NASA's Galileo mission began 20 years ago.


Illustration of NASA’s Juno spacecraft firing its main engine
to slow down and go into orbit around Jupiter.
Lockheed Martin built the Juno spacecraft for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Protecting Juno’s Heart by EVAN GOUGH on NOVEMBER 4, 2015

A computer-generated image of the Juno spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech


Juno's Orbit

Uploaded on Jun 28, 2011
Find out more at Here

and HERE
Juno's unique polar orbit is the key to the mission's design. What's so special about it?
Credit: NASA/JPL/SwRI Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


Juno spacecraft and its science instruments. Image credit: NASA/JPL


Juno orbital graphic


7 DAYS OUT FROM ORBITAL INSERTION, NASA’S JUNO IMAGES JUPITER AND ITS LARGEST MOONS

This annotated color view of Jupiter and its four largest moons -- Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto --
was taken by the JunoCam camera on NASA's Juno spacecraft on June 21, 2016, at a distance of
6.8 million miles (10.9 million kilometers) from Jupiter.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM JUNO’S MISSION TO JUPITER?

Illustration of NASA's Juno spacecraft firing its main engine to slow down and go into orbit around Jupiter.
Lockheed Martin built the Juno spacecraft for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
Credit: NASA/Lockheed Martin


Jupiter: Into the Unknown (NASA Juno Mission Trailer)

Published on Jun 23, 2016 Secrets lie deep within Jupiter, shrouded in the solar system's strongest magnetic field
and most lethal radiation belts. On July 4, 2016, NASA's Juno spacecraft will plunge into
uncharted territory, entering orbit around the gas giant and passing closer than any spacecraft before.
Juno will see Jupiter for what it really is, but first it must pass the trial of orbit insertion.
For more information: and here Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


JUNO CAPTURES A STUNNING JOVIAN ‘PEARL’ December 2016


New Juno image of Jupiter taken on Dec. 11, 2016. Processed by Damian Peach

This is the original image sent by JunoCam on Dec. 11 and features the eighth in a string of large storms in the planet’s southern hemisphere. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

4-frame animation spans 24 Jovian days, or about 10 Earth days. The passage of time is accelerated by a factor of 600,000. Some of the ovals are visible as well as a variety of jets – west to east and east to west. Credit: NASA

JUNO BUZZES JUPITER A MERE 4,300 KM’S ABOVE THE CLOUD TOPS

Illustration of NASA's Juno spacecraft firing its main engine to slow down and go into orbit around Jupiter. Lockheed Martin built the Juno spacecraft for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Lockheed Martin

False color view of Jupiter’s polar haze, created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt using data from the JunoCam instrument. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Eric Jorgensen

To accomplish its science objectives, Juno is orbiting Jupiter’s poles and passing very close to the planet, avoiding the most powerful (and hazardous) radiation belts in the process. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Juno’s Latest Close Flyby of Jupiter on This Week @NASA – February 3, 2017

Published on Feb 3, 2017 NASA’s Juno spacecraft made its latest close flyby of Jupiter Feb. 2 -- passing about 2,700 miles above the planet’s clouds. This was the fourth close flyby since Juno began orbiting Jupiter last year on July 4. During these close passes instruments on the spacecraft probe beneath the cloud cover to collect scientific data about the planet's structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere. This information could help us better understand the planetary systems being discovered around other stars. Also, Cassini Sees Saturn’s Rings in Greater Detail, The Most Extreme Blazars, NASA at Super Bowl Event, NASA at NBA Black Heritage Celebration, and Day of Remembrance! Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

JUNO WILL GET NO CLOSER TO JUPITER DUE TO ENGINE TROUBLES

Jupiter’s south pole. captured by the JunoCam on Feb. 2, 2017, from an altitude of about 62,800 miles (101,000 kilometers) above the cloud tops. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/John Landino

This amateur-processed image was taken on Dec. 11th, 2016, at 9:27 a.m. PST (12:27 p.m. EST), as NASA’s Juno spacecraft performed its third close flyby of Jupiter. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Eric Jorgensen

Jupiter: Into the Unknown (NASA Juno Mission Trailer)

Published on Jun 23, 2016 Secrets lie deep within Jupiter, shrouded in the solar system's strongest magnetic field and most lethal radiation belts. On July 4, 2016, NASA's Juno spacecraft will plunge into uncharted territory, entering orbit around the gas giant and passing closer than any spacecraft before. Juno will see Jupiter for what it really is, but first it must pass the trial of orbit insertion. For more information: Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Published on Feb 3, 2017 NASA’s Juno spacecraft made its latest close flyby of Jupiter Feb. 2 -- passing about 2,700 miles above the planet’s clouds. This was the fourth close flyby since Juno began orbiting Jupiter last year on July 4. During these close passes instruments on the spacecraft probe beneath the cloud cover to collect scientific data about the planet's structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere. This information could help us better understand the planetary systems being discovered around other stars. Also, Cassini Sees Saturn’s Rings in Greater Detail, The Most Extreme Blazars, NASA at Super Bowl Event, NASA at NBA Black Heritage Celebration, and Day of Remembrance! Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

NASA JUNO: 3-D Flyover of Jupiter’s North Pole in Infrared

Jupiter: Into the Unknown (NASA Juno Mission Trailer)

The Juice Mission

Artist concept of JUICE, an ESA concept for a Jupiter-moons orbiter mission. Credit: ESA


Jupiter-Bound Spacecraft Takes A Small Step To Seek Habitable Worlds by ELIZABETH HOWELL on DECEMBER 1, 2014

Artist?s impression of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) near Jupiter and one of its moons, Europa. Credit: ESA/AOES
It takes years of painstaking work to get a spacecraft off the ground. So when you have a spacecraft like JUICE (the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer)
set to launch in 2022, you need to back up about a decade to get things figured out. How will the spacecraft get there?
What science instruments will it carry? What will the spacecraft look like and what systems will support its work?


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Even Though it Hasn’t Launched Yet, JUICE Took its First Images of Jupiter and its Moons

This is the first glimpse of JUICE’s eventual destination captured by the spacecraft’s NavCam during ground testing. Image Credit: Airbus Defense and Space.

JUICE will spend almost five years studying Jupiter’s ocean-bearing moons. From left to right, JUICE will visit Callisto for multiple flybys, Europa for two flybys, and Ganymede for flybys and orbital insertion. Image Credit left to right: NASA/JPL/DLR; NASA/JPL/DLR; NASA/JPL.

A raw image from JUICE’s NavCam. In this image, taken at a distance of over 600 million km (373 million miles) the moons are only a few pixels. Image Credit: Airbus Defence and Space.

A simulated NavCam view of Jupiter’s moons. Image Credit: Airbus Defense and Space.

Artist’s impression of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) near Jupiter and one of its moons, Europa. Credit: ESA/AOES

SPACEX's Mission Proposal

SpaceX’s newly revealed Interplanetary Transit System will make travel to Mars, and other destinations in our Solar System, possible. Credit: SpaceX

Exploring The Icy Moons of Jupiter. NASA's Europa Clipper and ESA's JUICE

Mars is the place that most of our spacecraft, landers and rovers are studying, searching for any evidence that life ever existed somewhere else in the Solar System. But talk to planetary scientists, and they’re just as excited about the ocean worlds of the Solar System; the moons, asteroids, dwarf planets and Kuiper Belt objects where there could be vast oceans of liquid water under thick shells of ice. The perfect environment for life to thrive. We’ve only had tantalizing hints that these oceans are there, but NASA is building a spacecraft that will study one of these worlds in detail: the Europa Clipper. And they’re not the only ones. The European Space Agency is building their own mission, the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: Follow us on Tumblr: : More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001 References: Evidence for an Ocean in Europa Nasa's Solar System Exploration page NASA Mission Named 'Europa Clipper' Europa Mission Instruments Europa or Enceladus? If NASA switches from SLS to Falcon Heavy, it won’t have to choose Old Data Reveal New Evidence of Europa Plumes COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2020 (PDF) Without a champion, Europa lander falls to NASA’s back burner NASA’S EUROPA LANDER MAY BE IN JEOPARDY AFTER THE MIDTERMS — AND SOME ARE FINE WITH SEEING IT GO Without Culberson, the lander no longer has its champion 50-foot ice spikes may dot Europa's surface JUICE ASSESSMENT STUDY REPORT (YELLOW BOOK) Europa Juice SCIENCE OBJECTIVES Ganymede in depth by the numbers ARIANESPACE AND ESA ANNOUNCE JUPITER ICY MOONS EXPLORER LAUNCH CONTRACT


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