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William Bacon's MARTIAN HABITATS Page Index


Introduction to Martian Habitats

NASA TRAVEL POSTER


Mars Infographic Living onMars


MARS INFO GRAPHIC HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS OF LIVING ON MARS

Current status of the deep space network


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NASA's Habitat Competion Page

FIVE TEAMS COMPETE TO DESIGN A 3D PRINTED MARS HABITAT FOR NASA

Team Zopherus of Rogers, Arkansas, is the first-place winner in NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, Phase 3: Level 1 competition. Credit: NASA

Team Zopherus - Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

Team Zopherus from Rogers, Arkansas, is the first-place winner of Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. The team’s design includes using a moving printer that deploys rovers to retrieve local materials. NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge aims to further the progression of sustainable shelters that will someday occupy the Moon, Mars or beyond by pushing citizen inventors to develop new technologies capable of additively manufacturing a habitat using indigenous resources with, or without, recyclable materials. The 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge is managed through a partnership with NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program and Bradley University. Bradley has partnered with sponsors Caterpillar, Bechtel and Brick & Mortar Ventures to administer the competition. NASA’s Centennial Challenges program is part of the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, and is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit:

AI SpaceFactory - MARSHA - Our Vertical Martian Future

Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA's 3D Printed Habitat Challenge Marsha is a proposal for a habitat on the surface of Mars built autonomously using local and mission-generated materials. DESIGN TEAM Jeffrey Montes (lead) David I. Malott Sima Shahverdi David Riedel Michael Bentley Tony Jin SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTS Structural engineering – Thornton Tomasetti (Dennis C.K. Poon, Chi Chung Tse, Saravanan Panchacharam, Hao Chen) Lighting design – Haniyeh Mirdamadi, Arup Concrete design – Dr. Victor Li, University of Michigan Polymer design – Techmer PM Mars geochemistry – Dr. Scott McLennan, Stony Brook University Planetary physics – Dr. Philip Metzger, University of Central Florida Systems and civil engineering – Dr. Paul van Susante, Michigan Tech ISRU/ robotics – Dr. Kris Zacny, Honeybee Robotics Basalt construction – PISCES Building energy performance - Duncan Phillips, RWDI script - Jeffrey Montes voice and music - Skyler Cocco photoreal renderings - Plomp (formerly Plompmozes) subtitle translation - Hassan Ashraf (Arabic), Amandine Cersosimo (French), Ambra Gadda (Italian), Lucas Licari and Jeffrey Montes (Spanish), Manavendra Mulye (Hindi) , Elias and Filippos Vokolos (Greek), Ary Wicaksana (Indonesian) Webpage twitter: ai_spacefactory

Kahn Yates - Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

Team Kahn-Yates from Jackson, Mississippi, won third place in Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. The team virtually designed a Mars habitat specifically suited to withstand dust storms and harsh climates on the red planet. NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge aims to further the progression of sustainable shelters that will someday occupy the Moon, Mars or beyond by pushing citizen inventors to develop new technologies capable of additively manufacturing a habitat using indigenous resources with, or without, recyclable materials. The 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge is managed through a partnership with NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program and Bradley University. Bradley has partnered with sponsors Caterpillar, Bechtel and Brick & Mortar Ventures to administer the competition. NASA’s Centennial Challenges program is part of the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, and is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit: For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit:

SEArch+/Apis Cor of New York won fourth place in Phase 3: Level 1 in NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. This team focuses on regolith construction to provide radiation shielding and physical protection. NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge aims to further the progression of sustainable shelters that will someday occupy the Moon, Mars or beyond by pushing citizen inventors to develop new technologies capable of additively manufacturing a habitat using indigenous resources with, or without, recyclable materials. The 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge is managed through a partnership with NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program and Bradley University. Bradley has partnered with sponsors Caterpillar, Bechtel and Brick & Mortar Ventures to administer the competition. NASA’s Centennial Challenges program is part of the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, and is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit: For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit:

Northwestern University - Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

Team Northwestern University from Evanston, Illinois, won fifth place in Phase 3: Level 1 of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. The team’s design features a unique spherical shell and outer parabolic dome. NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge aims to further the progression of sustainable shelters that will someday occupy the Moon, Mars or beyond by pushing citizen inventors to develop new technologies capable of additively manufacturing a habitat using indigenous resources with, or without, recyclable materials. The 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge is managed through a partnership with NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program and Bradley University. Bradley has partnered with sponsors Caterpillar, Bechtel and Brick & Mortar Ventures to administer the competition. NASA’s Centennial Challenges program is part of the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, and is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit: For information about the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, visit:


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Habitation on Mars


Landing on Mars


Living on mars


Why it's Hard Living on mars


Cost of Living on mars


Mars city design design your martian city

AUGUST 31, 2018 BY MATT WILLIAMS
This is the Habitat in Hawaii Helping Astronauts Preparing to Explore Mars

the NASA-funded Hawai’i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (Hi-SEAS)

When it comes time to send astronauts to Mars, those who make the journey will need to be ready for a number of challenges. In addition to enduring about six-months in space both ways, the first astronauts to explore Mars will also need to be prepared to spend months living on the surface. This will consist of long periods spent in a pressurized habitat and regular forays to the surface wearing pressure suits.

Aerial image of the Hi-SEAS habitat, acquired on April 20th, 2016. Credit: NASA/Hi-SEAS

HI-SEAS is a martian simulation on the slopes of the Mauna Loa volcano on the island of Hawaii. Credits: HI-SEAS

The Marius Hills Skylight, as observed by the Japanese SELENE/Kaguya research team. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

Two members of Mission V conducting a geological study using mock space suits. Credit: NASA/Hi-SEAS

The Hi-SEAS habitat, showing the solar panels and generator the crews rely on for electricity. Credit: Hi-SEAS




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This is a Dust Devil… on Mars

The first two dust devil images are from a region on Mars called Acidalia Planitia, a region on Mars known for spawning dust devils.

A topographical map of Mars. Acidalia Planitia is at top centre, a uniform blue area. Image Credit: By United States Geological Survey Public Domain,

Dust Devils on Mars Seen by NASA's Curiosity Rover

On recent summer afternoons on Mars, navigation cameras aboard NASA's Curiosity Mars rover observed several whirlwinds carrying Martian dust across Gale Crater. Dust devils result from sunshine warming the ground, prompting convective rising of air. All the dust devils were seen in a southward direction from the rover. Timing is accelerated and contrast has been modified to make frame-to-frame changes easier to see. For more information, read the full articl

MRO’s HiRISE camera captured this image of the so-called serpentine dust devil on Mars in 2012. Image Credit: By NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona – file, Public Domain,

A dust devil inside a Martian crater, as imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor. The dark spot is the dust devil itself, the streak is the trail left by the devil, and the long parallel streaks are sand dunes on the floor of the crater. Image Credit: MGS/ Public Domain,

The artful creations of the Martian wind. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

More dust-devils on the surface of Mars. The visual interplay between the dust devil tracks and the wind-driven dunes is beautiful. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

A very large Martian dust devil. This one reached 20 km high. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona Share this:


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The Mars One Mission Proposal


MARS ONE MISSION INFOGRAPHIC

MARS INFOGRAPHIC

MARS ONE ARTIST CONCEPTIONs

Artist�s conception of Mars One human settlement. Credit: Mars One/Brian Versteeg
How possible is it to land humans on Mars? And can Mars One, the organization proposing to start
with sending four astronauts one way, capable of doing it by 2025 as it promises?
A new study says that the Mars One concept could fail on several points:
oxygen levels could skyrocket unsafely. Using the local resources to generate habitability is unproven.
The technology is expensive. But the founder of Mars One says the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
student study is based on the wrong assumptions.

MARS ONE ARTIST CONCEPTIONS

MARS ONE MERGES WITH MOBILE PAYMENT COMPANY IN ODD RESTRUCTURING

Artist’s concept of a Martian astronaut standing outside the Mars One habitat. Credit: Bryan Versteeg/Mars One

Published on Jun 6, 2012 How does Mars One plan to establish a human settlement on Mars? Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles. MARS ONE PAGE Follow Mars One Newsletter: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: Google+: LinkedIn: Pinterest: Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

MARS ONE

Mars One, the Plan to Make a Reality Show on Mars, is Bankrupt

In 2012, Dutch entrepreneur Bas Lansdorp launched the world’s first private and crowdsourced-effort to create a permanent outpost on Mars. Known as Mars One, this organization was the focus of a lot of press since it’s inception, some of it good, most of it bad. While there were many who called the organization’s plan a “suicide mission” or a “scam”, others invested their time, energy, and expertise to help make it happen.

Artist’s concept of a Martian astronaut standing outside the Mars One habitat. Credit: Bryan Versteeg/Mars One


Animated view of Mars One's human settlement on Mars

This is an animated view of Mars One's future settlement on Mars.
Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles.
Follow Mars One Newsletter: Facebook:Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles. Twitter: Instagram: Google+: :LinkedIn : Pinterest

Mars One's human mission to Mars - 2012 introduction film

How does Mars One plan to establish a human settlement on Mars?
Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles..
Follow Mars One Newsletter: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: Google+: :LinkedIn : Pinterest


MARS ONE IN BANKRUPTCY


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