William Bacon's Homepages/Mission to Alpha Centauri



Comments?????
Email the Webmaster!!!!!


Locations of Site Visitors

This page was last updated on August 16, 2021


William Bacon's Mission to Alpha Centuari Page Index


Current status of the deep space network


Very Large Telescope joins Breakthrough search for Alpha Centauri's planets
BY ALAN BOYLE on January 9, 2017 at 10:59 am




The ESO's (European Southern Observatory) Very Large Telescope looms in the foreground of this image, and a star map has been superimposed on the night sky to show the locations of Alpha Centauri and Proxima Centauri.
(ESO Photo)


Setting Sail for Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri is the closest star system to us at about four light years away but it would take us thousands of years to get there by rocket. Some people just don't have that much patience. ------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to Fw:Thinking: For the audio podcast, blog and more, visit the Fw:Thinking website: Fw:Thinking on Twitter: Jonathan Strickland on Twitter: Fw:Thinking on Facebook: Setting Sail for Alpha Centauri:

Everyone, it seems, hates Proxima b. Even Proxima c.

<>

ParallaxNick 24.7K subscribers There's a reason I have waited so long to return to my favourite exoplanet. The news has been all-but utterly bleak. Still, I hold on to rays of hope, however physically impossible that metaphor may be. Proxima playlist:

Proxima Centauri Update - Major New Discoveries From Closest Star

<>

You can buy Universe Sandbox 2 game here: Or get a shirt: Hello and welcome! My name is Anton and in this video, we will talk about a new discovery coming from the nearby system of Proxima Centauri...a new planet? Paper: Twitter: Facebook: Twitch: Bitcoins to spare? Donate them here to help this channel grow! 1GFiTKxWyEjAjZv4vsNtWTUmL53HgXBuvu The hardware used to record these videos: CPU: Video Card: Motherboard: RAM: PSU: Case: Microphone: Mixer: Recording and Editing:


Click here to return to top of page


Mission to Alpha Centauri

Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy

CHANDRA OBSERVATORY CHECKS TO MAKE SURE ALPHA CENTAURI IS SAFE, YOU KNOW, IN CASE WE DECIDE TO VISIT



Speculation: By Isaac Arthur
Outward Bound: Colonizing Alpha Centauri

A journey out to the stars to colonize Alpha Centauri Visit our sponsor, Brilliant: We've looked at colonizing our own solar system, from Mars to Venus, and all the way inward to the Sun itself and out to the dark edges of the Oort Cloud. In this episode we conclude the Outward Bound Series by heading to our nearest neighboring star system, Alpha Centauri, and look at the trials and tribulations of colonizing binary star systems and red dwarves. Visit our Website: Join the Facebook Group: Support the Channel on Patreon: To help us grow your SFIA community, follow on Twitter and RT our future content. : Visit the sub-reddit Listen or Download the audio of this episode from Soundcloud: Cover Art by Jakub Grygier: Script Editing Andy P Finrod Felagund Gregory Leal Keith Blockus Matthew Acker N Kern Sigmund Kopperud (Wicked Woxel) Graphics Team: Edward Nardella Jeremy Jozwik Jarred Eagley Justin Dixon Jeremy Jozwik Katie Byrne Kris Holland of Mafic Stufios: Luuk Warringa Mihail Yordanov Murat Mamkegh Nick Talmers Nieuwoudt Pierre Demet Sergio Botero: Stefan Blandin Music Supervisor Luca De Rosa Music: Markus Junnikkala, "Hail the Victorious Dead" Evan King, "Altered Carbon" Evan King , "Overwatch" Ender Guney, "Epic Cinematic Trailer" NJ Mandaville, "Plagal" Koalips, "Kvazar" Phase Shift, "Mystic Forest" Sergey Cheremisinov, "Jump In Infinity" Dan MCLeod, "Stargazers" Aerium, "Waters of Atlantis" Aerium, "Fifth star of Aldebaran" In memory of Link (2008 – Feb 20, 2018) You will be missed my furry friend Caption author (Portuguese (Brazil)) Obama num unicórnio atirando num campo florido Caption author (Korean) 남윤수 Caption author (Chinese) Tan Xu Category Science & Technology

Project Dragonfly. A Laser-Powered Probe to Alpha Centauri

Seeding the Milky Way with Life Using Genesis Missions

When exploring other planets and celestial bodies, NASA missions are required to abide by the practice known as “planetary protection“. This practice states that measures must be taken during the designing of a mission to ensure that biological contamination of both the planet/body being explored and Earth (in the case of sample-return missions) are prevented.

A new instrument called the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Genomes (STEG) is being developed to find evidence of life on other worlds. Credit: NASA/Jenny Mottor

Project Starshot, an initiative sponsored by the Breakthrough Foundation, is intended to be humanity’s first interstellar voyage. Credit:breakthroughinitiatives.org

Thank You Breakthrough Inititives



Artist’s impression of the Dragonfly spacecraft concept. Credit and Copyright: David A Hardy (2015)

A new study expands on the classical theory of panspermia, addressing whether or not life could be distributed on a galactic scale. Credit: NASA

Can We Really Get to Alpha Centauri? The Breakthrough Starshot Mission Explained

The distances between stars are so vast, it’s hard to wrap your mind around it. Even our far flung Voyagers have barely reached interstellar space, and would take tens of thousands of years to get to even the nearest star. But scientists and engineers are considering what it would actually take to send a spacecraft to another star. It’s called Project Dragonfly, and would use existing or near future technologies to send a 3,000 kg spacecraft to Alpha Centauri within 100 years. Project Dragonfly paper Audio Podcast version: ITunes: RSS: Video Podcast version: ITunes: RSS: Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001

Project Dragonfly: Sail to the starsTobias Häfnera,∗
,1, Manisha Kushwahab,2, Onur Celikb,3, Filippo Bellizzi (PDF)

Web page of the chandra observatory



The Alpha Centauri system, shown in the optical and X-ray wavelenghts (using Chandra data). Credit: chandra.harvard.edu

The respective habitable zones around Alpha Centauri A and B. Credit: Planetary Habitability Laboratory



What these observations showed was that any planet orbiting within the habitable zone of A would receive (on average) a lower dose of X-rays compared to similar planets around the Sun. For planets orbiting withing the habitable zone of B, the X-ray dose they received would be about five times higher. Meanwhile, planets orbiting within Proxima Centauri’s habitable zone would get an average of 500 times more X-rays, and 50,000 times more during a big flare

At a distance of only 25 trillion miles, the Alpha Centauri star system is a prime target in humanity's search for life outside our Solar System. Astronomers would like to know what kind of environment exists around the two stars in Alpha Centauri that closely resemble our Sun. To learn about this, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has been monitoring the Alpha Centauri system every six months for over a decade. Chandra is the only X-ray observatory capable of resolving the two Sun-like stars to determine which star is doing what. A new study indicates these two stars are likely not pummeling any orbiting planets with large amounts of X-ray radiation. This is promising news for the sustainability of life on any planets astronomers find around these two nearby stars in the future.

CHANDRA OBSERVATORY CHECKS TO MAKE SURE ALPHA CENTAURI IS SAFE, YOU KNOW,
IN CASE WE DECIDE TO VISIT

Still image of the X-ray source observed by Chandra, showing the captured flare up at bottom Credit: NASA/CXC/Pontifical Catholic Univ./F.Bauer et al.

The two brightest stars of the Centaurus constellation – (left) Alpha Centauri and (right) Beta Centauri. The faint red star in the center of the red circle is Proxima Centauri. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Skatebiker

The respective habitable zones around Alpha Centauri A and B. Credit: Planetary Habitability Laboratory

A night in VLT and ALMA observatories (sound also recorded on location) from Jordi Busque on Vimeo.

The Very Large Telescope (VLT) consists of four individual telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 m across and four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. It is located on cerro Paranal (2635m), in northern Chile.

The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is the largest ground-based astronomical project consisting of 66 12-metre (39 ft), and 7-metre (23 ft) diameter radio telescopes. It is also the world's highest array of radio telescopes at 5,000 metres altitude in the Chajnantor plateau, northern Chile.

Images and sounds recorded on location by Jordi Busqué.

For more information, please visit www.jordibusque.com

As the only X-ray observatory capable of resolving Alpha Centauri A and B during its current close orbital approach, Chandra observed these two main stars every six months for the past thirteen years. These long-term measurements captured a full cycle of increases and decreases in X-ray activity, in much the same way that the Sun has an 11-year sunspot cycle.

At a distance of only 25 trillion miles, the Alpha Centauri star system is a prime target in humanity's search for life outside our Solar System. Astronomers would like to know what kind of environment exists around the two stars in Alpha Centauri that closely resemble our Sun. To learn about this, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has been monitoring the Alpha Centauri system every six months for over a decade. Chandra is the only X-ray observatory capable of resolving the two Sun-like stars to determine which star is doing what. A new study indicates these two stars are likely not pummeling any orbiting planets with large amounts of X-ray radiation. This is promising news for the sustainability of life on any planets astronomers find around these two nearby stars in the future.


Click here to return to top of page


The Closest Planet Ever Discovered Outside the Solar System
Could be Habitable With a Dayside Ocean

Artist Conception of the surface Of Proxima Centuari B With proxima Centuari C (Proxima) at the Horizon

PROXIMA CENTAURI B, THE EARTH'S CLOSEST EXOPLANET

➥ Subscribe - As a rule, objects within the habitable zone are located tens or hundreds of light years away from us. But quite recently scientists have come across one more exoplanet which is unprecedentedly close - 4.22 light years away. The object is near the closest star to our Solar System and its name is Proxima Centauri b. ➥ Patreon - #PROXIMA #UNIVERSE #Kosmo

Artist’s impression of Proxima b, which was discovered using the Radial Velocity method. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

Aritsts impression of LHS 1140b, a “Super-Earth” that orbits an orange dwarf star just 14 light years away. Credit: M. Weiss/CfA

This artist’s impression shows several of the planets orbiting the ultra-cool red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. Credit: ESO

Nearest exoplanets could host life

Cornell University Published on Apr 9, 2019 Lisa Kaltenegger, director of Cornell University's Carl Sagan Institute, describes research offering new hope for finding life on some of the closest exoplanets. More at

Artist’s impression of a flaring red dwarf star, orbited by an exoplanet. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

This infographic compares the orbit of the planet around Proxima Centauri (Proxima b) with the same region of the Solar System. Credit: Pale Red Dot

Artist’s depiction of a watery exoplanet orbiting a distant red dwarf star. New research indicates that Proxima b could be especially watery. Credit: CfA

Artist’s impression of a habitable exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star. The habitability of the planets of red dwarf stars is conjectural. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser.

The two brightest stars of the Centaurus constellation – (left) Alpha Centauri and (right) Beta Centauri. The faint red star in the center of the red circle is Proxima Centauri. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Skatebiker

Proxima Centuari located

Will We Ever Reach Another Star? The Challenge of Interstellar Travel

We hear about discoveries of exoplanets every day. So how long will it take us to find another planet like Earth? Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001

Weighing in at 60,000 tons when fully fuelled, Daedalus would dwarf even the Saturn V rocket. Credit: Adrian Mann

A concept for a multi-generation ship being designed by the TU Delft Starship Team (DSTART), with support from the ESA. Credit and Copyright: Nils Faber & Angelo Vermeulen

Numerical constraints on the size of generation ships from total
energy expenditure on board, annual food production and space
farming techniques (PDF)

Here’s What the Climate Might Look Like on Proxima Centauri B

Located at the heart of the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) – part of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center – is the Discover supercomputer, a 129,000-core cluster of Linux-based processors. This supercomputer, which is capable of conducting 6.8 petaflops (6.8 trillion) operations per second, is tasked with running sophisticated climate models to predict what Earth’s climate will look like in the future.

The “Discover” supercomputing cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation. Credit: NASA/GSFC/NSCC

Illustration of Kepler-186f, a recently-discovered, possibly Earthlike exoplanet that could be a host to life. Credit: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Artist’s impression of DG CVn, a nearby binary consisting of two red dwarf stars. Credits: NASA/GSFC

Artist’s impression of the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

Earth Climate Models Bring Exoplanet To Life

In a generic brick building on the northwestern edge of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center campus in Greenbelt, Maryland, thousands of computers packed in racks the size of vending machines hum in a deafening chorus of data crunching. Day and night, they spit out five quadrillion calculations per second. Known collectively as the Discover supercomputer, these machines are tasked with running sophisticated climate models to predict Earth’s future climate. But now, they’re also sussing out something much farther away: whether any of the more than 4,000 curiously weird planets beyond our solar system — or exoplanets — discovered in the past two decades could have the ingredients necessary to support life. Read more: Music: "Machine Learning" by Jon Cotton and Ben Niblett; "No Wave" by Julien Vignon; "The Missing Star" by Matthew Charles Gilbert Davidson; all from Universal Production Music Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center LK Ward (USRA): Lead Producer Claire Andreoli (NASA/GSFC): Lead Public Affairs Officer Lonnie Shekhtman (ADNET): Lead Writer Alex Kekesi (GST): Lead Visualizer Anthony DelGenio (NASA/GSFC GISS): Lead Scientist Avi Mandell (NASA/GSFC): Lead Scientist Michael J. Way (NASA/GSFC GISS): Scientist Chris Smith (USRA): Animator Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET): Technical Support This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13518 If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/NASAGoddard Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center · Instagram · Twitter- NASA GODDARD · Twitter-NASA GODDARD PICS · Facebook: · Flickr

Astronomers Might Have Imaged a Second Planet Around Nearby Proxima Centauri – and it Might Have a Huge Set of Rings

In 2016, astronomers working for the European Southern Observatory (ESO) confirmed the existence of a terrestrial planet around Earth’s closest stellar neighbor – Proxima Centauri. The discovery of this nearby extrasolar planet (Proxima b) caused no shortage of excitement because, in addition to being similar in size to Earth, it was found to orbit within the star’s habitable zone (HZ).

The exoplanet HIP 65426b – the first to be seen by the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Credit: ESO For years, SPHERE has been revealing the existence of protoplanetary disks around distant stars, something that is extremely difficult to do using conventional optics. However, this particular set of data was gathered during the four-year SpHere INfrared survey for Exoplanets (SHINE) survey, where SPHERE was used to image 600 nearby stars in the near-infrared spectrum

Three images of the fast-moving wave-like features in the dusty disc around the nearby star AU Microscopii. Credit: ESO/NASA/ESA

Labeled version of four of the twenty disks that comprise ALMA’s highest resolution survey of nearby protoplanetary disks. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO) S. Andrews et al.; NRAO/AUI/NSF, S. Dagnello

Artist concept of a lightsail craft approaching the potentially habitable exoplanet Proxima b. Credit: PHL @ UPR Arecibo


Click here to return to top of page


Can we reach Alpha Centauri by a generation ship?

WHAT’S THE MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE YOU SHOULD SEND IN A GENERATIONAL SHIP TO PROXIMA CENTAURI?

A concept for a multi-generation ship being designed by the TU Delft Starship Team (DSTART), with support from the ESA. Credit and Copyright: Nils Faber & Angelo Vermeulen

The Project Orion concept for a nuclear-powered spacecraft. Credit:silodrome.co

Weighing in at 60,000 tons when fully fuelled, Daedalus would dwarf even the Saturn V rocket. Credit: Adrian Mann

Illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the Sun. Credits: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Project Starshot, an initiative sponsored by the Breakthrough Foundation, is intended to be humanity’s first interstellar voyage. Credit:breakthroughinitiatives.org

Will We Ever Reach Another Star? The Challenge of Interstellar Travel

Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001 The nearest star is 4 light years away. That means that light, traveling at 300,000 kilometers per second would still need 4 YEARS to reach the nearest star. The fastest spacecraft ever launched by humans would need tens of thousands of years to make that trip. But science fiction encourages us to think it’s possible. Kirk and Spock zip from world to world with a warp drive violating the Prime Directive right in it’s smug little Roddenberrian face. Han and Chewy can make the Kessel run in only 12 parsecs, which is confusing and requires fan theories to resolve the cognitive space-distance dissonance, and Galactica, The SDF 3, and Guild Navigators all participate in the folding of space.

How Big Would a Generation Ship Need to be to Keep a Crew of 500 Alive
for the Journey to Another Star?

There’s no two-ways about it, the Universe is an extremely big place! And thanks to the limitations placed upon us by Special Relativity, traveling to even the closest star systems could take millennia. As we addressed in a previous article, the estimated travel time to the nearest star system (Alpha Centauri) could take anywhere from 19,000 to 81,000 years using conventional methods.


Click here to return to top of page




ESO's Pale Red Dot Project & other Special Projects


The Pale Red Dot Project


Astronomy Picture of the day, January 18, 2016
Proxima Centauri



Proxima Centauri: The Closest Star Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Explanation: Does the closest star to our Sun have planets? No one is sure -- but you can now follow frequent updates of a new search that is taking place during the first few months of this year. The closest star, Proxima Centauri, is the nearest member of the Alpha Centauri star system. Light takes only 4.24 years to reach us from Proxima Centauri. This small red star, captured in the center of the featured image by the Hubble Space Telescope, is so faint that it was only discovered in 1915 and is only visible through a telescope. Telescope-created X-shaped diffraction spikes surround Proxima Centauri, while several stars further out in our Milky Way Galaxy are visible in the background. The brightest star in the Alpha Centauri system is quite similar to our Sun, has been known as long as recorded history, and is the third brightest star in the night sky. The Alpha Centauri system is primarily visible from Earth's Southern Hemisphere. Starting last week, the European Southern Observatory's Pale Red Dot project began investigating slight changes in Proxima Centauri to see if they result from a planet -- possibly an Earth-sized planet. Although unlikely, were a modern civilization found living on a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, its proximity makes it a reasonable possibility that humanity could communicate with them. #PaleRedDot : Follow the search for planets around Proxima Centauri.


Image: Proxima Centauri, indicated by the arrow, in an image from the
first night's run at the Pale Red Dot observing campaign at La Silla.
Credit: ESO/Guillem Anglada-Escudé.



ESOcast 80: Follow a Live Planet Hunt




 
Published on Jan 15, 2016
 
And a unique new project will now allow members of the public to go behind the scenes and
 follow a planet hunt as it happens!
 
More information and download options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/esoc...
Subscribe to ESOcast in iTunes! https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/esoc...
Receive future episodes on YouTube by pressing the Subscribe button above or follow us on
Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/esoastronomy
Watch more ESOcast episodes: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/arch...
 
Find out how to view and contribute subtitles for the ESOcast in multiple languages, or
 translate this video on dotSUB: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/pa...
Credit: ESO
 


Project Blue: A Space Telescope to Find Another Earth





Interstellar Escape from Proxima b is Barely Possible with Chemical Rockets



SPACEFLIGHT FROM SUPER-EARTHS IS DIFFICULT


PROJECT BLUE: BUILDING A SPACE TELESCOPE THAT COULD DIRECTLY OBSERVE PLANETS AROUND ALPHA CENTAURI




Artist's concept of the Project Blue space telescope, which the organization
hopes to use to spot exoplanets in Alpha Centauri beginning in 2020.
Credit: projectblue.org






Artist's impression of a planet orbiting the star Alpha Centauri B,
a member of the triple star system that is the closest to Earth.
Credit: ESO






Project Blue's mission concept, showing the telescope, its launch and deployment.
Credit: ESO


UPCOMING TELESCOPES SHOULD BE ABLE TO DETECT MOUNTAINS
AND OTHER LANDSCAPES ON EXTRASOLAR PLANETS




Using the Transit Method, a team of astronomers has found a way to
determine the presence of mountains and other features on exoplanets.
Credit: NASA/Tim Pyle





Artist's impression of Proxima b, which was discovered
using the Radial Velocity method.
Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser




This infographic compares the orbit of the planet around
Proxima Centauri (Proxima b) with the same region of the Solar System.
Credit: Pale Red Dot




Artist's impression of an extra-solar planet transiting its star.
Credit: QUB Astrophysics Research Center




Artists impression of a Super-Earth, a class of planet that has many
times the mass of Earth, but less than a Uranus or Neptune-sized planet.
Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech




Project Starshot, an initiative sponsored by the Breakthrough Foundation,
is intended to be humanity's first interstellar voyage.
Credit:




Satellite image of the Himalayan mountain chain, as imaged by
NASA's Landsat-7 imagery of Himalayas.
Credit: NASA




Color mosaic of Mars greatest mountain, Olympus Mons, viewed from orbit.
Credit NASA/JPL




Artist's impression of the OWL Telescope being deployed at
night from its enclosure, where it will operated during the daytime.
Credit: ESO


PROXIMA CENTAURI JUST RELEASED A FLARE SO POWERFUL IT WAS VISIBLE TO THE UNAIDED EYE.
PLANETS THERE WOULD GET SCORCHED




Artist impression of a red dwarf star like Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to our sun. New analysis of ALMA observations reveal that Proxima Centauri emitted a powerful flare that would have created inhospitable conditions for planets in that system. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; D. Berry




Artist's impression of Proxima b, which was discovered using the Radial Velocity method. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser




The Red Dots project is successor to the Pale Red Dot project, which discovered Proxima b last summer. Credit: ESO






Artist's impression of the surface of the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri. The double star Alpha Centauri AB is visible to the upper right of Proxima itself. Credit: ESO


Click here to return to top of page


xWhat Would be the Benefits of an Interstellar Probe?

The Proposed Bussard RamJet

NASA’s Voyager 2 Enters Interstellar Space

Forty-one years after it launched into space, NASA’s Voyager 2 probe has exited our solar bubble and entered the region between stars. Its twin, Voyager 1, made this historic crossing in 2012. Edward Stone, the Voyager mission’s project scientist, and Suzanne Dodd, the mission project manager, discuss this major milestone and what’s to come for the trailblazing probe. For more about the Voyagers, including the Grand Tour of the Solar System and the Golden Record, visit NASA's Voyager's webpage

Thank you NASA for Voyager

NASA's Voyager page

Illustration showing the position of NASA’s Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 probes, outside of the heliosphere, a protective bubble created by the Sun that extends well past the orbit of Pluto. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

What will it take before human beings can travel to the nearest star system within their own lifetimes? Credit: Shigemi Numazawa/ Project Daedalus

Project Starshot, an initiative sponsored by the Breakthrough Foundation, is intended to be humanity’s first interstellar voyage. Credit:breakthroughinitiatives.org

Can We Really Get to Alpha Centauri? The Breakthrough Starshot Mission Explained

The distances between stars are so vast, it’s hard to wrap your mind around it. Even our far flung Voyagers have barely reached interstellar space, and would take tens of thousands of years to get to even the nearest star. But scientists and engineers are considering what it would actually take to send a spacecraft to another star. It’s called Project Dragonfly, and would use existing or near future technologies to send a 3,000 kg spacecraft to Alpha Centauri within 100 years. Project Dragonfly paper Audio Podcast version: ITunes: RSS: Video Podcast version: ITunes: RSS: Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: : More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001


What If We Do Find Aliens? How Prepared Is Earth For Meeting Extraterrestrials

We've been so busy wondering how we'll find aliens that we never stopped to consider what we'll do if we actually encounter them. How does an alien discovery get communicated to the media? Who's responsible to craft a response? References: Post Detection Scientists in US are urged to seek contact with aliens

RSS: Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: : More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001


Click here to return to top of page


What Would It Take To See Artificial Lights at Proxima Centauri B?

Is there an alien civilization next door? It’s…possible(ish). In late 2020, we discovered a signal from the direction of Proxima Centauri (not necessarily from Proxima Centauri), our closest neighbour star. Named BLC- 1 by project Break Through Listen, the signal is still being analyzed to ensure it isn’t simply an echo of our own civilization – typically what they turn out to be. But why not just directly look at planets in Proxima Centauri and see if a civilization is there?

#universe_dope City Lights from the ISS (8K)

ity Lights at Night as seen from the International Space Station in 8K Resolution. Compilation created by Universe Dope via NASA Public Archive. Music by Mark Hutson - "Endless Void" Space Station Facts: 230 individuals from 18 countries have visited the International Space Station The space station has been continuously occupied since November 2000 An international crew of six people live and work while traveling at a speed of five miles per second, orbiting Earth about every 90 minutes. In 24 hours, the space station makes 16 orbits of Earth, traveling through 16 sunrises and sunsets Peggy Whitson set the record for spending the most total time living and working in space at 665 days on Sept. 2, 2017 The acre of solar panels that power the station means sometimes you can look up in the sky at dawn or dusk and see the spaceship flying over your home, even if you live in a big city. Find sighting opportunities at The living and working space in the station is larger than a six-bedroom house (and has six sleeping quarters, two bathrooms, a gym, and a 360-degree view bay window). To mitigate the loss of muscle and bone mass in the human body in microgravity, the astronauts work out at least two hours a day. Astronauts and cosmonauts have conducted more than 205 spacewalks (and counting!) for space station construction, maintenance and repair since December 1998 The solar array wingspan (240 feet) is about the same length as the world’s largest passenger aircraft, the Airbus A380. Follow us on Instagram: Follow us on Facebook: #universe_dope

Two Confirmed Planets at Proxima Centauri. One in the Habitable Zone!

Astronomers have discovered thousands of exoplanets, and still need to confirm thousands more. And over the coming decades, we’ll probably learn of millions of planets, orbiting stars we’ve never heard of. That’s why it’s reassuring to know astronomers are learning a tremendous amount about the closest star system to our own, Proxima Centauri. In fact, we now know of two planets orbiting the red dwarf star, one of which is in the habitable zone. Thumbnail credit: NASA/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics/D. Aguilar Our Book is out! Audio Podcast version: I-TUNES RSS: Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: Follow us on Tumblr: : More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001 Music: Left Spine Down - “X-Ray” SFIA Discord Server: Support us at: More stories at: Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Follow us on Tumblr: Like us on Facebook: Instagram - References: Two Confirmed Planets at Proxima Centauri. One in the Habitable Zone! A terrestrial planet candidate in a temperate orbit around Proxima Centauri Revisiting Proxima with ESPRESSO A low-mass planet candidate orbiting Proxima Centauri at a distance of 1.5 AU View ORCID ProfileMario Damasso1,*, View ORCID ProfileFabio Del New Tricks from Old Data: Texas Astronomer Uses 25-year-old Hubble Data to Confirm Planet Proxima Centauri c Searching for the near infrared counterpart of Proxima c using multi-epoch high contrast SPHERE data at VLT ? (PDF) (Blocked by chrome) Break through initiative What'll It Take to Find Life? Searching the Universe for Biosignatures

This infographic compares the orbit of the planet around Proxima Centauri (Proxima b) with the same region of the Solar System. Proxima Centauri is smaller and cooler than the Sun and the planet orbits much closer to its star than Mercury. As a result it lies well within the habitable zone, where liquid water can exist on the planet’s surface.

Computer rendering of the LUVOIR Observatory – Credit NASA

HabEx Observatory using its 52m floating starshade to block out unwanted starlight – Credit NASA

Beatty (2021) Figure 5 The above figure from Beatty’s publication shows the trade offs between the distance from Earth, the level of urbanization, and the class of parent star. The first two variables, level of urbanization and distance from Earth, are self evident. The brighter the artificial lights, the easier they are to see. If the planet resides closer to Earth, its lights are easier to see. But the parent star also plays a role in visibility. Planets orbiting smaller, dimmer stars have better contrast. Their stars are faint enough to not overwhelm artificial illumination and so lower levels of urbanization can be seen on planets in M red dwarf star systems. The figure’s blue colour shade indicates the certainty of detection. 1 sigma (the Greek letter that’s denoted in the figure) is about 67% certainty. 3 sigma is closer to 99%. 10 sigma is virtually 100%.

This composite image, which has become a popular poster, shows a global view of Earth at night, compiled from over 400 satellite images. NASA researchers have used these images of nighttime lights to study weather around urban areas. Credit: NASA/NOAA

The glow of an Ecumenopolis world in the space strategy video game Stellaris Habitable planets in the game can evolve into these city worlds as your civilization develops over centuries in a simulated galaxy – Graphics from the video game Stellaris, developed and published by Paradox Interactive. Used with permission

from Beatty’s article shows the distinct powerful glow of High Pressure Sodium Lights from an Ecumenopolis. These lights peak around the 600nm range in the highlighted area.


Click here to Jump to the related Universe today's pages



Click here to return to top of page


Articles on the Mission to Alpha Centauri

Website of the carl sagan Institute on Life on Proxima Centuari B

The Carl Sagn institute on Life on Proxima Centauri B

Lessons from early Earth: UV surface radiation should not limit the habitability of active M star systems
from Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 485, Issue 4, June 2019, Pages 5598–5603



Interstellar Probes: The Benefits to Astronomy and Astrophysics K. F. Longa(PDF)





Various articles on Alpha Centauri Universe today

How Long Would It Take To Travel To The Nearest Star?

STORY FROM UNIVERSE TODAY.COM

Chandra Observatory Checks to Make Sure Alpha Centauri is Safe, You Know, in Case We Decide to Visit



Proxima B - The Closest Star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri, has a Planet in the Habitable Zone. Life Could be There Right Now



Proxima B - Potentially Habitable Exoplanet Confirmed Around Nearest Star!



Ross 128b Closest Potentially-Habitable World Found Around “Quiet” Star

LHS 1140b Is This The Exoplanet Where Life Will First Be Found?


Gliese 667Cc Potential ‘Goldilocks’ Planet Found


GJ 536,Discovery Of A Nearby Super Earth With Only 5 Times Our Mass


TRAPPIST-1 Huge News, Seven Earth-Sized Worlds Orbiting a Red Dwarf, Three in the Habitable Zone


Of the Two Stars in Alpha Centauri, One is Probably More Habitable than the Other

What is a Generation Ship?

A Very Interesting Radio Signal was Just Detected Coming from Proxima Centauri


What Would It Take To See Artificial Lights at Proxima Centauri B?


The Color of Habitable Worlds


Universetoday's CATEGORY: ASTRONOMY


Universetoday's CATEGORY: PROXIMA B


Universetoday's CATEGORY: SETI


Universetoday's CATEGORY: TELESCOPES


Universetoday's TAG: ECUMENOPOLIS


Universetoday's TAG: HABITABLE EXOPLANET IMAGER (HABEX)


Universetoday's TAG: JWST


Universetoday's TAG: LUVOIR


Universetoday's TAG: PROXIMA B


Universetoday's TAG: SETI


Universetoday's TAG: STELLARIS


https://www.universetoday.com/tag/stellaris/" height="1200" width="1000" marginwidth="1" marginheight="1" scrolling="yes" border="0" frameborder="0" >


Click here to Proxima sub section


Videos

Can We Really Get to Alpha Centauri? The Breakthrough Starshot Mission Explaine

<>

It’s going to be almost impossible to travel to another star, but a new idea was announced that might get us to a nearby star within our lifetime. How will it work? Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: Follow us on Tumblr: More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001 Music: Left Spine Down - “X-Ray”

Articles from Centuari Dreams





PDFs

Report on Proxima Centuari-b

Searching for the near infrared counterpart of Proxima c using multi-epoch high contrast SPHERE data at VLT ?

Why planetary and exoplanetary protection differ:
The case of long duration Genesis missions to
habitable but sterile M-dwarf oxygen planets (PDF)

Lessons from early Earth: UV surface radiation should not limit the habitability of active M star systems (PDF)


Click here to return to top of page